Employee Misclassification

*UPDATE – THE FINAL RULE HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN MAY 6, 2021.

Regardless of whether you call it a teeter totter or seesaw, the DOL continues its ups and downs with its interpretations of important laws. You may recall my January 7, 2021 post reminding all y’all of the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) final rule

*UPDATE – THE FINAL RULE HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN MAY 6, 2021.

As I blogged about a few months ago, on September 22, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced a proposed rule simplifying the test to determine whether a worker is considered an “employee” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) or an

On September 22, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced a proposed rule simplifying the test to determine whether a worker is considered an “employee” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) or an “independent contractor”. In short, the proposed rule uses the “economic reality” test as the basis for whether a worker is

On April 1, 2019, the DOL issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), relating to whether two or more entities are “joint employers” for purposes of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  This arrangement becomes significant when determining overtime for an individual who does not work overtime at either employer, but combined, does (and thus,

On November 8, 2018, the DOL issued Opinion Letter FLSA2018-24, addressing the question of when additional payments to an exempt employee based on an hourly, daily or shift basis defeats the professional exemption. In short, an exempt employee may have a “guaranteed salary”, but then also receive additional compensation on an hourly, daily, or