In addition to my blog about the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLA), the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (Families First Act or FFCRA) also contains the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA).  Emergency paid sick time (EPST) will go into effect 15 days after the Families Act is enacted – April 1,

I greatly suspect that everyone reading my blog is aware by now that Minnesota’s minimum wage increased January 1, 2020 ($10 for large employers; $8.15 small employers). However, for those employers who use minimum wage for certain activities (i.e. travel time) –  be sure to change that rate in your payroll system as well! Also,

Except or Non-Exempt?  That is the question (which should not be answered by eenie-meenie-miney-mo)!  The U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued its Final Rule today (September 24, 2019) regarding the overtime exceptions under the so-called “white collar” exemptions.  As you may recall, the DOL previously issued a final rule in May 2016, but that rule

Employers (wherever located) with employees working in Minneapolis – don’t forget that the minimum wage increases today, July 1, 2019, to $11/hr for small businesses and $12.25 for large businesses.

Quick Facts – Reminders:

  • Small business = 100 or fewer employees.
  • Large business = more than 100 employees.
  • An “employee” is someone who works at

Today the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry (MNDOLI) issued employers yet another reminder not to engage in “wage theft” from employees, and encouraged subscribers to share the message. So, I’ll do my civic duty and share. In short, MNDOLI reminds employers of the following (with my comments below each point):

  • Pay your employees the

Admittedly, I’m a little late blogging about this one…not sure how it escaped me. It is slightly old news, but important for home health care providers or other employers who use varying average hourly rates. The Department of Labor (DOL) issued an opinion letter on December 21, 2018 regarding the determination of minimum wage and

As 2018 comes to a close, it is a great time for employers to address lingering issues that have been on the back burner and start “fresh” in the new year. A new year is a great time to roll out changes for both administration purposes and for employees; new year, new policies. Here are