In the past week there was nothing really Earth-shattering as far as wage and hour updates, but certainly some updates to note:

  • MnDOLI issued a reminder to employers that most Minnesota employers are subject to both state and federal wage laws…employers must review both laws (and ordinances) to ensure compliance!  For example, unlike FLSA:

So this is exciting! No, really, it is! As you know, under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the employee of one company can be found to be a “joint employee” of another, making both jointly and severally liable for that employee’s wages (and thus, overtime). Historically, whether two companies were “joint employers” was been

So probably not super exciting or applicable for many employers,  but, as I blog all things wage and hour, here you go! On January 7, 2020, the Department of Labor (DOL) released Opinion Letter FLSA2020-2, opining as to whether educational assistants paid on a per-project basis can meet either the “salary basis” or “fee basis”

On January 7, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor issued its first Opinion Letter of the new year –  FLSA2020-1.  In this instance an employer pays employees a non-discretionary lump sum bonus of $3,000 who complete a 10 week training program and agree to continue training for another 8 weeks. However, the employee will

On September 12, 2019, three City of Minneapolis Council members shared a draft ordinance, the Minneapolis Freelance Worker Protections Ordinance. As it is just in the draft stages, I won’t go into great detail here, but to point it out.  For those Minnesota employers who rely on independent contractors – the development of this

Just as soon as Minnesota employers start to understand the new Minnesota Wage Theft Law (enacted July 1, 2019), the City of Minneapolis has passed its own ordinance, the Minneapolis Wage Theft Prevention Ordinance, effective January 1, 2020.  Employers located in Minneapolis and employers located outside of Minneapolis but who have employees who work

Except or Non-Exempt?  That is the question (which should not be answered by eenie-meenie-miney-mo)!  The U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued its Final Rule today (September 24, 2019) regarding the overtime exceptions under the so-called “white collar” exemptions.  As you may recall, the DOL previously issued a final rule in May 2016, but that rule

On March 14, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued Opinion Letter FLSA2019-1. In this situation, an employer asked whether the FLSA applies when its employees (live-in superintendents and residential janitors) are exempt from state law overtime. The DOL confirmed what I’ve posted about several times:

When a federal, state, or local minimum