Effective today, Minnesota employers must follow the new so-called “Wage Theft Law” (it is actually just a bunch of amendments to existing law). This is primarily a change in recordkeeping and employee notices, creating an administrative burden likely to cause many in HR to want to raise the white surrender flag. While I’m not a

Contractors – today is the last day to fill out your annual prevailing wage survey! The Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry (MnDOLI) uses information collected from the survey to determine the prevailing wage rates on commercial, highway/heavy and residential construction projects in Minnesota. Thus, this is non-union contractors’ chance to have a say in

The Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry’s (MnDOLI) May 31, 2018 Wage and Hour Bulletin reminds employers of teen working limitations, as schools are ending for the summer. Although I wrote about this topic recently in this blog post, as the teens start to flood the summer marketplace, I thought it important to share (and

It’s that time of year again. March Madness, spring break, and teens that are looking forward to summer and getting a job, or working extra hours at their current job during spring break. What does this mean as a Minnesota employer?

Wages – The youth wage rate is (as of January 1, 2018) $7.87/hr. for

Aerial_photo_of_downtown_Minneapolis

On May 27, 2016, the Minneapolis City Council unanimously approved the Minneapolis Sick and Safe Time Ordinance, Title 2, Chapter 40 – Workplace Regulations.  The final Ordinance mandates unpaid sick and safe leave for employers with 1 to 5 employees, and paid sick and safe leave for employers with 6 or more employees. Notably, the final amendment includes not only the use for sick and safe care, but also school snow days.

Below is a quick overview of what the ordinance requires, who it applies to, what burdens employers have, and the implications of a violation. However, time will only tell how this plays out in reality.

What Does the Minneapolis Sick and Safe Time Ordinance Require?

The Ordinance, effective July 1, 2017, requires employers to provide employees with paid/unpaid sick and safe time.  New employers (with 1 or more employees), will have 12 months to provide unpaid time off. After 12 months, new employers will be subject to the Ordinance in its totality (this 12 month delay will only be allowed for 5 years from the enactment).

Employees working in Minneapolis will accrue sick and safe time unpaid leave at the rate of 1 hour for every 30 worked, up to an annual cap of 48 hours (either calendar or fiscal year). Exempt (salaried) employees are deemed to work 40 hours each week unless their normal workweek is less than 40 hours.  Employees must be allowed to use sick and safe time after 90 calendar days of employment.  Employers must permit an employee to carry over at least 80 hours of accrued but unused sick and safe time into the following year.

Additionally, sick and safe leave time need not be paid this time out at termination. Employees must be able to use the leave in the same increment of time consistent with current payroll practices and existing employer policies (but no more than 4 hours).  They must be compensated at the same hourly rate with the same benefits (except they are not entitled to lost tips or commissions and compensation is only required for the hours the employee was scheduled to work).

Who Is An “Employer” and “Employee” Under the Ordinance?

Does this Ordinance affect your business based in Eden Prairie or Alexandria?  It depends on whether you are a covered employer, defined below.  The Ordinance defines several terms with specificity, but here it is in a nutshell:
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